Joseph M. Hanna

All articles by Joseph M. Hanna

 

NFL Issues Statement on Regulation of Sports Gambling

On Monday, May 14, 2018, the Supreme Court struck down a federal law that prohibited states from authorizing gambling on sports. The ruling opened the door for states to legalize and regulate the gambling industry within their borders. However, the ruling also leaves open the possibility that Congress will act to set national standards in the regulation of sports gambling. Indeed, shortly after the ruling was handed down, Sen. Orrin Hatch (Utah) said that he will introduce legislation to regulate sports gambling on a federal…  

Putative Class Action against NCAA and Universities Dismissed for Untimeliness

On May 17, 2018, a federal judge dismissed a putative class’ wage suit against the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and several universities for failing to file within the two-year period required under the statute of limitations.  Lawrence “Poppy” Livers, a former Villanova University football player, brought a claim in September 2017, asserting that the NCAA, Villanova, and other universities were violating the minimum wage provision of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).  Specifically, Livers contended that he and other college athletes with scholarships should…  

NFL Issues New Anthem Rules

On May 23, 2018, all 32 NFL team owners voted to approve a policy statement that would require players to stand during, and show respect for, the national anthem. However, if a player did not want to stand for the national anthem, then he must remain in the locker room. If a player decides to protest the national anthem by kneeling, or disrespecting the anthem or the flag in any way, then the team, not the player, will be fined. According to NFL Commissioner Roger…  

Update: Foul Ball Leads to Lawsuit Against College and NCAA

On February 14, 2018, former Division II college baseball player Joseph Gutowski filed suit against West Chester University of Pennsylvania and the NCAA after injuries he sustained during a game in 2016. In his complaint, Gutowski alleges that a foul ball hit him directly in the head during a home game in April 2016, while he was seated on the players’ bench in the dugout. Claiming permanent injuries, he is now seeking damages for breach of contract, negligence, unjust enrichment, and negligent infliction of…  

NCAA’s Response to Legal Gambling: Rule Changes and Support for Federal Regulation

In response to the May 14, 2018 Supreme Court ruling which opened the door for states to legalize sports gambling, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) released a statement outlining its reaction to the decision. The statement is headlined with support for federal regulation of the sports gambling industry as a “necessary safeguard to the integrity of college sports.” In addition, the NCAA Board of Governors has temporarily suspended its rule prohibiting championship events from being held in states that offer legal sports betting in…  

Misrepresentation of Baseball Bat Weight Sparks Class Action Suit

Easton Baseball / Softball, Inc. is a top manufacturer of baseball and softball products, has been subjected to a class action suit filed in United States District Court for the Central District of California. After discovering that the baseball bat he purchased for his son was heavier than advertised, plaintiff Ricky Wisdom is seeking to stop the sale of incorrectly weighted bats and recover damages for consumers paying a premium for Easton’s products. Easton has acquired a strong reputation in the sporting goods industry for…  

Under Armour Sued in Latest Data Breach Case

In April 2018, Rebecca Murray filed a putative class action suit against Under Armour relating to the March 2018 data breach of Under Armour’s MyFitnessPal nutrition and fitness app. On Tuesday, May 15, 2018 Under Armour filed a notice of removal transferring the case to federal court in the Central District of California Murray v. Under Armour, 2:18-CV-04032. The case arises from a data breach which Under Armour announced in late March 2018. Under Armour said that the breach affected an estimated $150…  

New York Giants and Quarterback Eli Manning Settle Memorabilia Fraud Lawsuit

New Jersey sports memorabilia dealer, Eric Inselberg, had established himself as a committed collector of New York Giants football mementos. He acquired countless items and donated more than $1 million worth of collectables to the team museum. However, his relationship with the team soured in the years leading up to a 2014 lawsuit between himself, the Giants, and Eli Manning. Days before the case was set to hit trial, an agreement was reached to settle the dispute arising out of the sale of Eli Manning…  

Michigan State Agrees to Pay $500 Million to Larry Nassar Victims

On, May 16, 2018, news broke of a monumental settlement that will require Michigan State University to pay $500 million to victims of Larry Nassar’s sexual assault. $425 million will be distributed to the 332 claimants seeking damages from the University for its failure to act on persistent complaints about the doctor. The remaining $75 million will be set aside for two years in the event that more victims of Nassar’s abuse come forward. The settlement is believed to be the largest ever in a…  

Retired NHL Veteran Alleging Former Teams Knew of Brain Injuries

After making his NHL debut in 1989, Mike Peluso played nine professional seasons as a bruising left winger for five different NHL franchises. He won the Stanley Cup in 1995 as an enforcer on the New Jersey Devils’ “Crash Line”. After his retirement in 1998, the long-term effects of his role as an enforcer and the resulting brain injuries formed the basis of a workers’ compensation suit against his former teams. The most recent allegations, however, have implications outside of workers’ compensation context…  

Supreme Court Bets on Federalism in Sports Gambling Ruling

On Monday, May 14, 2018, the Supreme Court of the United States struck down a federal statute controlling the states’ ability to regulate sports gambling, destroying Nevada’s monopoly and opening the door for other states to get in on the multi-billion dollar industry. In its majority opinion, the court voted to strike down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992 (PASPA). Although PAPSA did not make sports gambling itself a federal crime, the Act made it unlawful for states to promote, license,…  

Medical Marijuana Puts an NFL Player’s Career in Limbo

In 2013 NFL running back Mike James was playing for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Monday Night Football. During the opening drive of the game, James broke his ankle after an opposing player fell on his foot, causing his ankle to be twisted awkwardly. James was rolling on the ground in excoriating pain and was later carted off the field with a left ankle injury. Surgery, a metal rod, and medal wires were needed to repair his ankle, and after the surgery, James was…  

Former University of Louisville Employee Alleging Discrimination, Retaliation Following Termination

On April 25, 2018, former University of Louisville employee, Kimberly Maffet, filed a lawsuit against the school, claiming that a number of wrongs against her ultimately led to undue termination. In particular, she asserts that she was discriminated against for her disability, retaliated against for speaking out on alleged supervisory misconduct, and wrongfully discharged on the basis of both her disability and retaliation. Prior to her termination, Maffet served as the Associate Athletic Director for Human Resources, and had been there for about 10 years.…  

NCAA Hopeful to Turn Over New Leaf in Wake of Scandals

On April 25, 2018, an NCAA commission circulated a report it believes will address internal corruption, which, in recent times, has seemingly saturated the realm of collegiate sports. The commission is led by former secretary of state, Condoleeza Rice, who was chosen by NCAA president, Mark Emmert to lead the charge and pen the report. In doing so, Rice was tasked with recommending some well-needed changes which could remedy issues within the NCAA’s internal affairs and improve its relationships and interactions with collegiate athletes going…  

Former NFL Cheerleaders Offer to Settle Discrimination Suit for $1 and a Meeting

On April 24, 2018, two former NFL cheerleaders voiced their willingness to settle their discrimination dispute with the NFL on two conditions. The cheerleaders determined that they would both stop pursuing their claims in court if league commissioner, Roger Goodell, would sit down with them for a four-hour, good-faith meeting and pay just $1 to each. The meeting would involve plaintiffs Kristan Ware and Bailey Davis, as well as several other cheerleaders who were not involved in the suit, but who are connected to the…  

Former NFL Players Demand Certainty, Haste in Assessment of Fraud Allegations in $1 Billion Settlement

On April 23, 2018, counsel for former NFL football players involved in the $1 billion concussion settlement filed a motion opposing a Pennsylvania court’s ruling which allowed the NFL to conduct ex parte interviews with the doctors who treated the players. As we have previously covered, the release of settlements had been slowed due to potentially fraudulent claims, allegedly “clogging the system,” and delaying relief to former players who had legitimate injuries. The motion filed by the Neurocognitive Football Lawyers (NCFL) sought to address…  

MLB Players Move to Compel Discovery Yet Again in Al Jazeera Libel Suit

 On April 20, 2018, MLB players Ryan Zimmerman and Ryan Howard, plaintiffs in the Al Jazeera libel case, filed another motion to compel discovery in the ongoing battle. As we have previously reported, this is not the players’ first attempt at extracting additional information from defendant Al Jazeera amid discovery. The defamation suit stems from their production and airing of a 2015 documentary, called “The Dark Side,” which accused the MLB players of using performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) while playing for the MLB. The entire…  

Tattoo Artist Sues WWE and Take-Two Interactive for Copyright Infringement

Catherine Alexander, a tattoo artist for professional WWE wrestler Randy Orton, sued World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. and Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. claiming that several of the video games in the WWE 2K series illegally copied Alexander’s copyrighted tattoos. Between 2003 and 2008, Alexander created several tattoos for Orton, including on his upper back, forearms, upper arms, and sleeve tattoos. On March 15, 2018, Alexander submitted applications to register copyrights on each of the tattoos. Back in 2009, WWE offered Alexander $450.00 for the rights to…  

DraftKings Seeks Declaration that Daily Fantasy Sports Contests are Legal in Texas

On April 16, 2018, DraftKings sought a declaratory judgment in Texas state court against Texas Attorney General, Ken Paxton. According to the petition, Paxton’s actions have sought to eliminate daily fantasy sports in Texas, and now, DraftKings is seeking a declaratory judgment to determine if daily sports are legal under Texas state law. DraftKings argued that the court need not look further than Paxton’s treatment of DraftKings’ main competitor, FanDuel, to see that Paxton’s “actions pose direct and particularized harm to DraftKings.” In their…  

NCAA Writes Another Letter to Court; Urges Refusal of Employee Status to Division I Players

On April 17, 2018, counsel for the NCAA submitted another letter to the Ninth Circuit, contending that a recent ruling should bear weight on the court’s ultimate decision whether to consider Division I athletes as employees. The NCAA has been entangled in a suit with former football player, Lamar Dawson, who alleges that the NCAA violated California law and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) in its refusal to pay student athletes minimum wage or overtime. As we have recently reported, the NCAA first…  

Lance Armstrong Settles Fraud Case for $5 Million

As we have previously reported, Lance Armstrong has been battling a dispute with former teammate, Floyd Landis, and the United States Postal Service (USPS) over his illicit use of performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs), which has apparently cost the government millions in undue sponsorship costs. On April 29, 2018, Armstrong agreed to settle the issue for $5 million, although the USPS initially sought close to $100 million. Of that $5 million, Landis is expected to receive $1.65 million. The stir initially began in 2006, when Armstrong…  

Battle of the Barbershops Continues: Alabama Alleges Infringement, Sues LeBron & Co.

On April 16, 2018, the Social Club Grooming Co., barbershop owner and host of Alabama’s “Shop Talk,” filed a trademark suit against LeBron James and his multimedia company, Uninterrupted Digital Ventures, LLC, for the same concern that LeBron expressed just weeks ago in a letter to the college – infringement. As we have recently covered, James and the University of Alabama have been at odds over the parties’ similarly themed barbershop shows, “The Shop,” and “Shop Talk,” respectively. Upon discovering the existence of Alabama’s…  

NFL Seeks Special Investigator to Query Fraud in Billion Dollar Concussion Settlement

On April 13, 2018, the NFL filed a motion seeking the appointment of a special investigator to more closely examine potentially fraudulent concussion claims that may be “clogging the system” of the $1 billion settlement. Of the 2,000 plus claims submitted to date, about 46 percent indicate the presence of fraud, according to the motion. The NFL maintains that a new investigator will have the appropriate resources to uncover intentional fraud, which the current claims administrator does not have the capacity to do. Specifically, the…  

Chick-Fil-A and ESPN Under Attack for Copyright Infringement

On April 10, 2018, music producer, Platinum Jack Entertainment, LLC filed suit in a Texas court against Chick-Fil-A and ESPN for their allegedly impermissible use of a band’s original music in recent commercials. The commercials feature sportscasters Joey Galloway and Adnan Virk of ESPN making chicken-related football commentary, with the tune of the song in dispute playing in the background. Though the song lacks the vocals that would make its appropriation clear, Platinum Jack contends that it is identifiable sans lyrics and is currently asserting…  

Widow of Notre Dame Football Player Hopeful for CTE Suit to Stand

As we have previously covered, the wife of former Notre Dame football player, Steven Schmitz, filed a lawsuit targeting Notre Dame and the NCAA in 2014 on behalf of her late husband. She is seeking to recover for the college and organization’s alleged “reckless disregard” for the safety of college football players, specifically during the time period that Schmitz spent playing for the team in the 1970s, which led to his diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in 2012, and his ultimate passing in…  

Update on Lamar Dawson’s Student-Athlete Wage Suit

On April 4, 2018, attorneys representing the NCAA wrote a letter to the Ninth Circuit notifying the court that the U.S. Supreme Court recently reversed a Ninth Circuit decision that the plaintiff, Lamar Dawson, cited in his opening brief. As we have previously reported, Dawson began a class-action lawsuit in September 2016, alleging the NCAA and Pac-12 violated California law and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) by not paying student-athletes minimum wage or overtime. In April 2017, the NCAA’s motion to dismiss was…  

Jury Reduces Fan’s Award in Case Against L.A. Dodgers

On September 16, 2009, longtime Los Angeles Dodgers fan, Leonard Romo, suffered injuries after Dodgers’ security guards tackled, handcuffed, and dragged him. He suffered shoulder, knee, back, and neck injuries, missed work, and later underwent knee surgery. Romo subsequently sued the Los Angeles Dodgers. According to the Dodgers, Romo and his daughter became belligerent after security guards asked Romo’s daughter to turn her T-shirt inside out because it had offensive language on it. After the 2016 personal injury action, Romo a jury awarded $475,000. Of…  

James Dolan and MSG Move to Dismiss Charles Oakley’s Defamation Claim

On March 30, 2018, Madison Square Garden, and New York Knicks owner, James Dolan asked Judge Richard J. Sullivan to dismiss the defamation claims brought by former New York Knick, Charles Oakley. As we have previously reported, Oakley sued defendants in September 2017 for allegedly humiliating himafter he was kicked out of a New York Knicks game and labeled an alcoholic on a radio talk show. According to the motion to dismiss, “[t]his is a meritless lawsuit brought by a famous former Knick…  

EA Still on the Hook for NFL Likeness Misuse; Wins on Sanctions Motion in the Meantime

As we have previously reported, Electronic Arts Inc. continues to be under fire for trying to evade responsibility for its alleged unauthorized use of thousands of NFL players’ likenesses in its video games, most notably in Madden NFL. On March 29, 2018, the retired players filed a motion in opposition to EA’s third attempt at summary judgment. According to the retired players’ motion, they represent a proposed class of over 7,500 other retired NFL players who claim to have been similarly aggrieved by EA’s…  

Scope of NCAA Corruption and Bribery Case Grows

On April 10, 2018, attorney Robert S. Khuzami added the University of Kansas and North Carolina State University to the list of NCAA basketball programs involved in the NCAA corruption and bribery case. As we have continued to cover, this case involves Adidas executive Jim Gatto, Adidas contractor Merl Code, and sports business manager Christian Dawkins. Each stand accused of facilitating six-figure payments to basketball players and their families in exchange for promises that the players would enroll at Adidas sponsored NCAA Division I…  

Missouri State Court Sides Against NFL in Move Petition from St. Louis Rams

On April 3, 2018, a Missouri Supreme Court Judge denied the NFL’s motion to dismiss in its lawsuit against the City of St. Louis, County of St. Louis, and the St. Louis Regional Convention and Sports Complex Authority (SCA), which operates the St. Louis Rams former stadium. The NFL attempted to argue that the Missouri state court did not have the jurisdictional authority to hear the case where The Rams Football Company, LLC, the NFL, and every NFL owner, 89 separate entities in total, were…  

Battle of the Barbershops: LeBron vs. Alabama

On April 2, 2018, LeBron James’ multimedia company, Uninterrupted, sent a stern letter to the University of Alabama for airing a sports talk series that feels strangely similar to his own new series, “The Shop.” The University of Alabama’s series, “Shop Talk,” much like James’ series, is set in a barber shop, and involves a group of people having casual conversation about an assortment of topics. James’ show, which has already gotten over four million views, features James, his friends, and other guests getting…  

Packers Fan Suing Bears Over Fan Gear Survives Motion to Dismiss

On March 30, 2018, U.S. District Judge Joan B. Gottschall ruled that Russell Beckman, a longtime Green Bay Packers fan, did not established that he had standing to sue the NFL, but he did meet his burden in his First Amendment claim against the Chicago Bears. As we have previously covered, Beckman, representing himself, sued the NFL and the Chicago Bears after he was not allowed entry to a Bears Season Ticket Holder Experience event at Soldier Field because he was wearing Green…  

Tattoo Copyright Infringement? Judge Says Too Soon To Tell

On March 30, 2018, a federal judge denied a motion in defense of a video game producer’s use of tattoo designs in its basketball-themed games. As we have previously covered, Solid Oak Sketches LLC, the owner of eight copyrighted tattoos donned by several high profile NBA players, filed suit against video game producer and distributer, Take-Two Productions, for alleged infringement. Solid Oak purchased the designs directly from the tattoo artists, and offered to allow Take-Two to use them for $819,000, or perpetually for $1.14…  

Texas Court Allows Clinic’s ERISA Suit Against NFL to Stand

On March 27, 2018, a Texas court partially granted and partially denied a four-time amended complaint in a suit filed by medical clinic, Advanced Physicians SC (AP), against Cigna Health and Life Insurance Company, Cigna Healthcare Management Inc., Connecticut General life Insurance Company, Great-West Healthcare-Cigna, and the NFL Player Insurance Plan. From the lawsuit, AP sought compensation under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, ERISA, for unpaid, but allegedly legitimate, claims for previous medical care rendered to retired NFL players and their families. According to…  

College Athlete Compensation Suit Moved to Trial

On March 28, 2018, U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken ruled the 2015 O’Bannon decision did not bar the recent NCAA antitrust lawsuit. As previously covered, a class of college athletes are attempting to obtain a judgement that would lift the cap on college athlete’s compensation. In their lawsuit, the college athletes argued that the NCAA violated federal antitrust law by conspiring to impose an artificial ceiling on the scholarships and benefits that college athletes may receive as payment for their athletic services, which arguably have…  

Former Chicago Bear Sues NFL for Damages from Concussions

On March 27, 2018, former Chicago Bear Craig Steltz filed a lawsuit against the NFL in Louisiana federal court. In the lawsuit, Steltz requested financial compensation for the chronic injuries, expenses, and intangible losses suffered as a result of the NFL’s “intentional tortious misconduct, including fraud, intentional misrepresentation, and negligence.” Steltz claimed that he suffers from the pathological and debilitating effects of mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBI) caused by the repeated concussive and sub-concussive impacts that he experienced while playing in the NFL. Steltz, a…  

WWE Persistent in Seeking Concussion Suit Sanctions

On March 22, 2018, World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. (WWE) sought the support of a federal court to uphold a sanctions recommendation provided a month earlier, which was directed toward attorney Konstantine Kyros. As we have previously covered, Kyros represents former WWE wrestlers, Evan Singleton and Vito LoGrasso, in their concussion suit against WWE. The recommendation for sanctions stemmed from Kyros’ failure to adequately respond to interrogatories amid discovery. WWE believes that the suggested sanctions, to include attorneys’ fees and costs covering the ongoing discovery…  

Maryland Moves to Legalize Sports Betting

On March 15, 2018, the lower chamber of the Maryland State Legislature, the House of Delegates, passed legislation that could legalize sports betting in Maryland. An overwhelming number of state legislatures, 124 to 14, voted to pass bill HB1014. HB1014 will now move onto the upper chamber of the Maryland State Legislature, the Maryland State Senate, specifically the Senate’s Budget and Taxation Committee. If HB1014 passes the Maryland State Senate, it then becomes subject to a voter referendum. Supporters of HB1014 say sports gambling…  

NCAA Fails to Appear for Trademark Trial, Files New Suit Entirely

On March 4, 2018, two owners of Southern California Ford dealerships filed for dismissal or staying of a trademark infringement suit initiated by the NCAA, while the parties await decision on the same issue from the Trademark Trial and Appeals Board (TTAB). The NCAA initiated a suit in response to the dealerships’ uses of “Markdown Madness,” claiming the slogan could easily be confused with the NCAA’s “March Madness.” Dealership owners and defendants, Ken Grody Management, Inc. and Dixon Ford, Inc., had already been defending the…  

New England Patriots Defensive End Sues Over NCAA Injury Insurance Policy

On March 9, 2018, Deatrich Wise Jr., a defensive end for the New England Patriots, filed a lawsuit against The Professional Athlete’s Insurance Group, PLLC (PAIG), agent Matthew Allen, Certain Underwriters at Lloyd’s, London, and International Specialty Insurance, Inc. (ISI). In the lawsuit, Wise alleged that the defendants misrepresented and failed to tender insurance benefits to Wise under the NCAA “loss of value” insurance policy. Wise is a former NCAA football player. He was designated as an “exceptional student-athlete” prior to the start…  

Sensitive Information Capped in NCAA Corruption/Bribery Case

As we recently covered, the NCAA corruption and bribery case continues to unfold and expand. As the government widens the scope of its search, it has simultaneously been trying to keep its findings under wraps. Although U.S. District Judges Lewis A. Kaplan and Edgardo Ramos both denied the government’s recent request for a gag order, they did acknowledge the need to protect some of the sensitive information obtained as the case progresses. On March 6, 2018, the court issued a protective order, providing…  

Judge Scales Back Discovery in NCAA Wrongful Death Suit

On March 1, 2018, a Texas court of appeals filed a writ of mandamus, partially granting and partially denying the NCAA’s appeal of a prior discovery order. The suit was initiated by Debra Ploetz, wife of former University of Texas football player, Greg Ploetz, who played for the team from 1968 to 1972 and who died in 2015 from Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). The wrongful death suit alleges the late athlete’s CTE condition and subsequent death resulted directly from his years spent playing for…  

Legal Fees Sought After NCAA Trademark Suit Deemed “Exceptional Case”

As we have previously reported, the NCAA has recently triumphed over a year-long trademark suit when its motion requesting an entry of default was granted back in January 2018, and a default judgment rendered thereafter. The suit alleged that defendants Robert Alexander and Kizzang LLC had infringed, diluted, and unfairly competed with the NCAA by using and attempting to register the marks “April Madness” and “Final 3.” The marks were strikingly similar to the NCAA’s well-known trademarks of “March Madness” and the “Final…  

Nike OK’d to Continue Using “Jumpman” Logo

On February 27, 2018 the Ninth Circuit ruled that Nike’s use of its iconic “Jumpman” logo did not infringe on copyrights to a 1984 image of Michael Jordan, as captured by photographer Jacobus Rentmeester. Following more than three years of litigation — and though the decision was split — Nike may continue to use the image without legal repercussions. Rentmeester originally shot and used the image of Jordan in a mid-air, “grand jeté-inspired pose,” which was featured in a 1984 issue of Life 

Reebok-CCM Settles Royalties Lawsuit

On March 2, 2018, the lawsuit between Reebok-CCM Hockey (CCM) and Hefter Impact Technologies, LLC was dismissed after the two parties reached a confidential settlement. Back in September 2015, Hefter sued CCM alleging that CCM contractually owed royalties on hockey helmets that were derivative of a Hefter design. The recent settlement came before the scheduled April 17, 2018 trial. Although the case never made it to trail, it did not gone without its fair share of litigation. For example, as we previously covered back in…  

Federal Judges Turn to Indiana State Court in DraftKings and FanDuel Lawsuit

On March 7, 2018, two Seventh Circuit judges, Judge Frank Easterbrook and Judge Ilana Diamond Rovner, certified the following question to the Supreme Court of Indiana, “Whether online fantasy‐sports operators that condition entry on payment, and distribute cash prizes, need the consent of players whose names, pictures, and statistics are used in the contests, in advertising the contests, or both.” As we have previously reported, in May 2017, a group of 3,000 college-athletes, led by former Northern Illinois University football players Akeem Daniels and…  

Cubs Dropped From Foul Ball Suit, If Only Temporarily

As we previously reported, a Cubs fan was struck in the face by a foul ball during an August 2017 game at Wrigley Field, where he brought his children to watch from the first base line. The injury left John “Jay” Loos blind in one eye and his other eye vulnerable to the same. He filed suit against both the MLB and the Cubs in October, alleging negligence by both parties, specifically, for failing to install a net which would have otherwise shielded him…  

Judge Delays NCAA $75 Million Settlement for the Fifth Time

On March 8, 2018, U.S. District Judge John Lee delayed final approval of a $75 million settlement for the fifth time after he learned that thousands of current and former NCAA student-athletes have still yet to be notified of the settlement. Judge Lee originally approved the $75 million settlement in July 2016, but delays, largely attributed to difficulties notifying more than 4 million student-athletes, including acquiring contact information and physically notifying the student-athletes, have prevented final approval. The most recent difficulty, and the reason for…  

Four MLB Teams Called Out for Potential Misuse of Revenue-Sharing Funds

The Miami Marlins, Oakland Athletics, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Tampa Bay Rays are under scrutiny as the Major League Baseball Players Association (MLBPA) filed a grievance against them on February 23, 2018. The grievance called into question whether their use of revenue-sharing funds has been consistent with the teams’ collective bargaining agreement. The collective bargaining agreement names its “principle objective” as “promot[ing] the growth of the Game and the industry on an individual Club and on an aggregate basis.” In doing so, the agreement requires that…