Author Archives: Joseph M. Hanna

Los Angeles Lakers Earn Penalty When NBA Fines Them $500K

The National Basketball Association (NBA) announced this week that following an investigation, it has fined the Los Angeles Lakers $500,000 for violating the NBA’s anti-tampering rule. The investigation found that the Lakers’ general manager Rob Pelinka expressed interest in All-Star Indiana Pacer forward Paul George while George was still under contract with his former team. This violates the NBA’s anti-tampering rules because it is prohibited to express interest in a player while he is still under contract. The punishment comes after the NBA had already…

Continue Reading....

A Fight Over Baseball Hall-of-Famer Honus Wagner’s Trademarks

Florida-based Honus Wagner Co. filed a complaint on July 5, 2017 in Florida federal court against an Indiana licensing management company for trademark infringement. Honus Wagner, considered by some to be the greatest shortstop ever, played for the Pittsburgh Pirates and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1936 as one of its original five members. In the beginning of the Twentieth Century, no player was more dominant than Wagner. He led the majors in hits, runs, doubles, total bases, extra-base hits, runs…

Continue Reading....

Public Backlash Major Influence in CFL Sacking of Art Briles

After public backlash, the Hamilton Tiger-Cats, a Canadian Football League team, backtracked on its decision to hire former Baylor football coach Art Briles. Briles had been fired from Baylor University in May 2016 after an investigation revealed that the university mishandled sexual assault allegations against football players. Hamilton Tiger-Cats CEO cited an underestimated “tsunami of negativity” from fans and the media, mainly in the U.S., as the main reason the hiring decision was quickly reversed the same day. The CEO also stated he believed…

Continue Reading....

Aggies Allegedly Violate Own Honor Code in “12th Man” Trademark Dispute

On January 19, 2017, an Alabama book editor filed sui against Texas A&M’s athletic department and the fund-raising 12th Man Foundation, accusing both entities and  three school employees of posting the “heart” of his unpublished book “12th Man: The Life and Legend of Texas A&M’s E. King Gill” on its website “nearly word-for-word” in January 2014 without his permission. The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court in Houston, begins by citing the Aggies Code of Honor, which states “An Aggie does not lie, cheat…

Continue Reading....

Showtime on the Ropes for Livestream Trouble During Mayweather-McGregor Fight

Showtime Networks is being sued by unhappy customers after it charged $99.99 to watch the Mayweather-McGregor fight in 1080p resolution, 60-frames-per-second, but then the livestream suffered numerous freezes and poor resolution. “Instead of being a ‘witness to history’ as defendant had promised, the only thing plaintiff witnessed was grainy video, error screens, buffer events, and stalls,” the complaint stated. The class action is alleging claims that Showtime willfully violated the Oregon Unlawful Trade Practices Act, and was unjustly enriched. A Showtime executive countered that they…

Continue Reading....

Baseball Scouts Strike Out on Claims League Conspires on Low Wages

Former Kansas City Royals scout Jordan Wyckoff and ex-Colorado Rockies scout Darwin Cox urged the Second Circuit on August 24, 2017 to narrowly construe Major League Baseball’s long-held antitrust exemption to only those functions essential to the holding of actual professional baseball games. The three-judge panel was skeptical of the scouts’ oral arguments. The dispute came up on appeal after the class action suit on behalf of 1,600 scouts was dismissed in September 2016 by the U.S. District Court in Manhattan. The complaint alleged that…

Continue Reading....

Can Consumers of Louisville Slugger Baseball Bats Hit a Homerun in Legal Battle Against Wilson Sporting Goods?

In January, a class-action lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court in Chicago against Wilson Sporting Goods by a consumer who purchased a Louisville Slugger baseball bat for his high-school age son. The Louisville Slugger baseball bat has a design flaw that causes its handle to move independently of the barrel when swung, which is alleged to decrease the power and detract from the performance of the bat. Wilson Sporting Goods also advertised the bats as meeting standards set by the United States Specialty…

Continue Reading....

Ruling on Field Stands for High School Coach Suspended for Praying on 50-yard Line

On August 23, 2017, the Ninth Circuit affirmed the denial of a preliminary injunction by Bremerton High School football coach Joseph Kennedy, who accused the school of violating his First Amendment rights by prohibiting him from praying on the 50-yard line immediately after football games. The prayers had started with just Kennedy on the field, but some players joined in over the years, and the prayers evolved into short motivational speeches. Although the praying took place after the games, students and parents were still…

Continue Reading....

SCA Promotions “Bounces Back”: Yahoo Owes Millions for Backing Out of NCAA Bracket Prize

Back in 2014, Yahoo promised college basketball fans a “Billon-Dollar Bracket,” which allowed anyone who could predict every winner in the 2014 NCAA men’s basketball tournament $1 billion dollars. To create this contest, Yahoo entered into an $11 million dollar contract with prize promoter SCA Promotions. Once the contract was finalized, SCA went looking to find insurance coverage for the grand prize. However, at the same time, Warren Buffet’s Berkshire Hathaway and Quicken Loans came up with their own $1 billion prize, and…

Continue Reading....

Ex-NFL Player’s Counsel Dodges Attorney’s Fees Assessment

A federal judge on August 21, 2017 denied a motion requesting that the NFL Player Disability and Neurocognitive Benefit Plan and its board assess $20,000 in attorney’s fees against the counsel of former NFL player, Brian Jackson. Brian Jackson, who played with the New York Jets, the New York Giants, then the St. Louis Rams, had originally sought disability benefits in December 2014 from football-related injuries. The claims committee unanimously denied his claim because Jackson had to prove he was experiencing at least 25 percent…

Continue Reading....