Cleveland Indians Logo Under Attack

The Native American advocacy group, “People Not Mascots,” is threatening the Cleveland Indians with a lawsuit for $9 billion in damages.  The group claims that the Cleveland Indians’ logo, Chief Wahoo, is offensive and racist. According to the group’s leader, Robert Roche, a Chiricahua Apache, the substantial amount of damages is based “on a hundred years of disparity, racism, exploitation, and profiteering.”  Roche further stated the logo has “been offensive since day one.  We are not mascots.  My children are not mascots.  We are people.”…
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Royals Foul Out in Court Over Flying Hotdogs

Is a flying hotdog an inherent risk of watching a baseball game? Missouri’s highest court said no.  The appeal before the court was a personal injury verdict in a jury trial.  The case was brought by Royals fan John Coomer who was hit by an airborne hotdog tossed by the team’s mascot “Sluggerrr.”  Coomer claimed that the flying hotdog caused a detached retina which required a surgery.  At trial, the jury found the team at no fault. It was a crucial question that determines whether…
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Does it Look Silly? Padres Reliever Alex Torres Says Safety over Sleekness.

It may look awkward and uncomfortable, but this protective cap could make the difference.  That seems to be the message Padres pitcher Alex Torres was making when he wore a protective cap during the Saturday night’s game. While the media hype is on NFL given the concussion class-action lawsuit, the awareness of concussion dangers has spread out both vertically and horizontally.  It has tinkled down to youth sports and spread to other professional sports like baseball. Although it is not a contact sports per se,…
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Former Baltimore Orioles Star sues Seminole Tribe for $10M Over Casino Slip and Fall

Two years ago retired MLB Hall of Famer Brooks Robinson fell off of a stage during a charity event at the Hard Rock Casino in Southern Florida. Now, Robinson is suing the casino’s owner – the Seminole Tribe – for almost $10 million in damages as a result of the plunge. Allegedly, Robinson’s tumble occurred after the star attempted to stand using the wall behind his chair for support. However, the “wall” was actually a curtain with no railing or other support behind it.  Robinson…
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City of San Jose resumes its fight against MLB’s Antitrust Exemption

Last fall U.S. District Court Judge Ronald Whyte dismissed a lawsuit filed by the city of San Jose against Major League Baseball (MLB) in which the city claimed that MLB had wrongfully prevented San Jose from enticing the Oakland A’s to relocate to Silicon Valley. Judge Whyte had reasoned that MLB’s antitrust exemption – a status bestowed on the league in a 1922 Supreme Court decision – barred the suit and required that the action be dismissed. On March 5, city attorneys filed a brief…
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Minor League Baseball Players Cry Foul – File Lawsuit Seeking Class Action Over Low Wages

A lawsuit filed in federal court seeks to overhaul minor league baseball’s pay scale with three former players arguing low pay, mandatory overtime and lack of collective bargaining rights all violate state and federal wage laws. Minor League Baseball is not a party to the lawsuit. Instead, suit was filed in federal California Northern District Court by former players Aaron Senne, Michael Liberto, and Oliver Odle against Major League Baseball, the Office of the Commissioner, Commissioner Bud Selig and their former teams the Miami Marlins,…
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A-Rod Forfeits in Fight with MLB Over Suspension; Drops Suit Against League

Recently, arbitrator Frederic Horowitz reduced the 211-game suspension of Yankees all-star third baseman Alex Rodriguez to 162 games for A-Rod’s role in the Biogensis performance-enhancing drugs scandal.  A-Rod wasn’t satisfied with the reduction, however, and filed a tortious interference lawsuit against Major League Baseball and MLB Commissioner Bud Selig in New York federal court with the hopes of reversing the suspension entirely. Now, A-Rod’s attorney Joseph Tacopina acknowledged to ESPN that the all-star had filed a voluntary notice of dismissal which effectively dropped the lawsuit. …
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Are Concussion Problems Heading to MLB as First Former Major Leaguer is Posthumously Diagnosed with CTE?

Researchers at Boston University’s Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy announced that former Major League Baseball player Ryan Freel was suffering from chronic traumatic encephalopathy (“CTE”) at the time of his suicide last December.  He is the first MLB player to be officially diagnosed with the disease. CTE is a brain injury associated with repetitive brain trauma (such as concussions) which causes the abnormal build-up of tau proteins in the brain.  Early symptoms of the disease include erratic behavior and memory loss, but it…
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The Atlanta Braves Are One Step Closer to a New Field

The Atlanta Braves are “thrilled” that the Cobb County Commission voted in favor of a public financing deal that will move the team out of downtown Atlanta for the first time since 1966. On November 26, 2013, by a 4-1 vote, the commissioners approved spending $300 million in tax revenues to fund part of a new $672 million Braves stadium.  The new field will open in 2017 and will be located in an Atlanta suburb.  The plan calls for the reallocation of current Cobb County…
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City of San Jose Loses Heart of Lawsuit Against Major League Baseball

A San Jose federal judge recently dismissed part of the City of San Jose’s lawsuit against Major League Baseball (MLB) over the league’s lack of action on a proposed move by the Oakland Athletics. The judge granted MLB’s motion to dismiss in part but also denied it in part. Most significantly, Judge Ronald M. Whyte held that the league’s antitrust exemption ultimately precluded San Jose’s claims against MLB under the Sherman Act. The Athletics’ owner had been pushing to move the team out…
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