Coinye Shutting Off “All of the Lights”

“Coinye West” is closing up shop because Kanye West isn’t happy.  On January 14, 2014, Kanye West filed a trademark infringement lawsuit against the virtual currency now known as Coinye.  The currency, which started as a joke, announced through its website, “Coinye is dead. You win, Kanye.” Earlier this month, the currency’s founders discussed Coinye West in an interview with Vibe. They talked about the soon to be launched currency.  Referring to Kanye, they said “I think he’s gonna love that there’s a…
Continue reading...

Supreme Court Denies NCAA’s Petition to Get “In The Game”

On January 13, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court denied the NCAA’s request to intervene as a party in Keller v. Electronic Arts Inc.  The Keller case stems from 2009 and involves “rights of publicity” and antitrust claims. Former college football players alleged that the EA violated their right of publicity and conspired with the NCAA by using their image and likeness in its videogames.  In EA’s appeal, the Ninth Circuit held that the NCAA was not immune to the players’ claims because the depictions in…
Continue reading...

TV Weather Anchor Hiring Decisions Are Acts in Furtherance of Free Speech

Thanks to a California intermediate appellate court’s recent reversal of a Los Angeles County trial court, CBS is halfway towards the early dismissal of a discrimination lawsuit filed by a man CBS declined to hire for a weather anchor position.  The case is Hunter v. CBS Broadcasting Inc. The plaintiff, Kyle Hunter, filed a gender and age discrimination complaint against CBS Broadcasting Inc. asserting that CBS violated the California Fair Employment and Housing Act.  He alleges that two local CBS television stations in Los Angeles…
Continue reading...

The End of the Greatest Sports Deal of All Time

It’s been called the greatest deal in sports franchise history, and now, it may finally come to an end. The NBA has long hoped to be relieved of a 1976 agreement that gave two brothers one-seventh of the visual media revenues received by four NBA teams. The agreement didn’t seem outrageous in 1976, but in 2014, that agreement has given the brothers over $300 million in media revenue. Finally, the NBA and the two brothers, Daniel and Ozzie Silna, are coming to a settlement to…
Continue reading...

Fan Brings Class Action Suit Against NFL Over Super Bowl Ticket Price

NFL fans know they are going to have to shell out big bucks if they want to go to the Super Bowl.  At the time this was written, tickets were priced at a minimum of $2,500 on ticket resale websites.  Despite getting a “deal” and only paying $2,000 a piece for his tickets, Josh Finkelman filed a class action lawsuit against the NFL in a New Jersey federal court on January 6th, 2014. Finkelman alleges the NFL violated New Jersey’s Consumer Fraud Act by limiting…
Continue reading...

Vikings Hire Two Top “Players” to Investigate Ex-Punter’s Allegations

The Minnesota Vikings have retained former Minnesota Supreme Court chief justice Eric Magnuson and former Justice Department attorney Chris Madel to investigate ex-punter Chris Kluwe’s allegations that he was fired for supporting same-sex marriage. On January 2, 2013, Kluwe published an article on Deadspin outlining the time leading up to his release from the team.  He discussed speaking out in support same-sex marriage and the response of team employees.  Kluwe said he is “pretty confident” he was fired after eight years as the Vikings’ punter…
Continue reading...

Johnny Depp Settles Bodyguard Lawsuit

According to TMZ, Johnny Depp settled a case brought against him concerning the alleged actions of his bodyguards.  Rather than fighting it out in court, Depp and the other defendants reached an agreement with Robin Eckert for an undisclosed amount. In December 2011, Depp attended an Iggy Pop concert in Los Angeles.  Allegedly, Eckert, who was seated next to Depp, was thrown to the ground by Depp’s bodyguards after dancing too close to the movie star.  Eckert claimed the bodyguards caused her pants to…
Continue reading...

Disney Hoping to Freeze “Frozen Land”

This holiday season Disney released its newest animated film “Frozen.” To celebrate, the company presented Phase 4 Films with a gift worse than Aunt Edna’s fruit cake – a trademark infringement lawsuit. Disney’s “Frozen” was released on November 19, 2013.  Less than three weeks earlier, Phase 4 changed the title of one of its from “The Legend of Sarila” to “Frozen Land.”  In a December 23 complaint, Disney stated the change was an attempt to ride the coattails of “Frozen’s” success. Under its original title,…
Continue reading...

Judges’ Panel Creates New Multi-District Litigation for NCAA Concussion Cases

A panel of federal judges recently ruled that ten class-action lawsuits brought against the National Collegiate Athletic Association (“NCAA”) will be consolidated into a single multi-district litigation in Chicago.  In essence, each suit alleges that the NCAA intentionally concealed the long term-risks of concussions sustained by student athletes in a variety of college sports.  The consolidation follows in the wake of the recent $765 million settlement of the NFL’s concussion litigation, a nearly identical action brought against the league by over 4,500 former NFL alumni.…
Continue reading...

Will It Soon Be Lights Out for the Black Out Rule?

Exciting news was announced for sports fans living in towns with fluctuating home game attendance this week.  The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced it is reviewing the need for the “blackout” rule. The nearly 40 year old rule prevents satellite and cable companies from televising NFL Events in a team’s home market if the game does not sell out.  The blackout rule was developed when teams earned a significant portion of their revenue from ticket sales.  The idea was implemented in 1975 to encourage fans…
Continue reading...