Rams Claim They Owe Fans Nothing After Move to Los Angeles

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The Los Angeles Rams responded to requests by fans to refund the purchases they made of useless seat licenses through the 2024 season. According to the NFL team, the plaintiff is misinterpreting the licensing agreements. The Rams are requesting that the court deny the requests of the proposed class. The Ram’s recent decision to move from St. Louis to Los Angeles has since caused issues with angry fans and season ticketholders. The plaintiffs point to a contract clause that obligates the team to pay back the fans if the team cancels the deals. The Rams are of the opinion that to interpret the contract this way is to ignore “clear and unambiguous” terms in the contract. The team asserts that the agreements either expire automatically in 2025 or if the ...
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College Players Not Entitled to Broadcasting Compensation

Gavel and money isolated on white Former college players claiming they should be reimbursed for the broadcasting of games they played in recently endured another defeat. On August 17, 2016, the Sixth Circuit dismissed their claims after the district court had done the same in 2015. The suit was filed against ESPN, CBS, NBC, and other broadcasting networks and several conferences in 2014. Javon Marshall, former Vanderbilt football player, and the proposed class of former student athletes are claiming violations of the Sherman Act, Lanham Act, and Tennessee Law. The plaintiffs claimed that the Tennessee law provided them with a “right of publicity.” The three judge panel, in a succinct two-page opinion held that the “argument is a legal fantasy.… Specifically, the plaintiffs’ statutory claim under the Tennessee Personal Rights Protection Act is meritless because that ...
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Reebok-CCM Presses for Details in Royalties Case

lawsuit Reebok-CCM Hockey is being sued by Hefter Impact Technologies (HIT), and is pressing the helmet maker for more information to substantiate their claims. HIT is alleging that Sport Maska, Inc., who is doing business as Reebok-CCM, ignored a contractual obligation by using a certain design of a hockey helmet which HIT has proprietary rights to. HIT had previously been well compensated from sales of the Vector line of helmets, which Reebok-CCM began producing in 2007 based on HIT designs. HIT was paid $1.4 million in royalties in addition to a one-time contractual payment of $350,000. However, the royalty payments stopped when Reebok-CCM began producing a new line of helmets, the Resistance series. HIT is claiming the Resistance series is substantially similar to the Vector series, and that compensation is due ...
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Last Minute Hall of Fame Games Cancellation Result in $5M Suit

iStock_000002268888_Large Fans acted swiftly after seeing their long awaited Hall of Fame Games at the Tom Benson Hall of Fame stadium cancelled. Ticketholders have filed a proposed class action suit in Ohio federal court claiming breach of contract and requesting reimbursement for travel, lodging, tickets, concessions, and other expenses totaling $5 million. The annual popular preseason event hosted adjacent the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton Ohio is a weekend long happening that includes the induction of new hall of famers. This year the Indiana Colts and the Green Bay Packers were supposed to square off at 8 p.m., however the game was cancelled around 8 p.m. by the NFL, citing safety issues for the players. The fans disagree and refer to a trend of mismanagement as the reason behind ...
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Under Armour in a TM Dogfight with Puppy Armour

lawsuit form Sports apparel giant, Under Armour (UA), is unhappy with the “Armour marks” on Puppy Armour’s canine clothing. Under Amour is suing S&O Innovations LLC and Silvo Schillen of “slavishly” misappropriating and copying its name and font. The athletic gear maker filed its petition in a Florida federal court, arguing that the dog products are styled to look similar to UA. S&O sells various kinds of dog T-shirts for different breeds. In its complaint, Under Armour argues that the T-shirts are the same color, with the Puppy Armour logo placed on a similar location as the company’s regular shirts. Under Armour sells athletic clothing, accessories and shoes, however it does not have a clothing line for dogs. Records at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office show that Puppy Armour was granted ...
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Can a Baseball Fan Argue Fear is Sufficient Injury in Class Action?

iStock_000014002689_Full On July 11, 2013, Gail Payne filed a class-action lawsuit against Major League Baseball (MLB) in the Federal District Court in Northern California. Payne claimed the MLB did not do enough to “protect fans from fast-moving balls and splintered bats.” Payne and the class members were seeking injunctive relief: to create better protections to MLB fans by adding more netting to stop foul balls and broken bats along the first and third-base lines. The lawsuit referenced a study by Bloomberg News in 2014, which reported 1,750 baseball spectators were injured each year. According to the complaint, the lawsuit’s class members represent all spectators in the “Danger Zone,” which is defined as “any unnetted/uncovered area between home plate and the foul plates located at the end of the right and left ...
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Agent Wants $810K From MLB Prospect’s Father

A&F Sports Agency, a Florida based sports agency, is suing the father of Luis Almanzar, the top baseball prospect from the Dominican Republic. The sports agent claims that the parties agreed to have the agency exclusively represent the prospect in all contract negotiations, yet the agency found out that another agent negotiated a contract between the Almanzars and the San Diego Padres. As a result, A&F Sports Agency missed out on approximately $810,000 – 20 per cent of any signing bonus – per the player representation agreement. According to the agency, it had represented Almanzar as early as 2014. The agency claims to have spoken to MLB scouts, provided the prospect with baseball equipment, arranged showcasing events and even helped him academically. Earlier, the agency claims it had spoken with ...
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The IRS Takes Gold in Rio

157168469 America’s Olympic Medalists in Rio will return to an unpleasant reality: a tax bill. Each medalist will be taxed on their award from the U.S. Olympic Committee and the monetary value of the medal itself. The U.S. Olympic Committee awards cash prizes to medal winners in the following amounts: $25,000 for gold, $15,000 for silver, and $10,000 for bronze. According the IRS, all cash prizes and awards are taxed as income earned abroad. The awards are treated the same as a lottery payout or casino winnings. Further, the medal’s value itself is taxed based on the scrap value of the metals used to compose the medal. The monetary value of a gold medal is approximately $550, silver is approximately $300, and the bronze, which is composed mostly of copper, has ...
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Schlichter Seeks Retirement Benefits From NFL

american football game with out of focus players in the background Former NFL quarterback Art Schlichter, who famously gambled away a promising playing career, is suing the NFL Player Retirement Plan in an attempt to receive retirement benefits he claims to have earned during a season in which he was suspended for betting on sports. Schlichter’s argument is although he was suspended for the 1983 season, he remained contractually obligated to the Baltimore Colts and therefore he is entitled to have that season count towards his retirement benefits. In his complaint, Schlichter alleges he is suffering from Parkinson’s disease and other brain injuries as a result of multiple concussions he sustained as a player. However, in order to gain eligibility for the NFL retirement plan, including pension and healthcare benefits, a player must be active for at least four years as ...
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“Let’s Get it On” at the Heart of Ed Sheeran’s Hit Song?

GettyImages-468407045 Ed Sheeran is facing yet another copyright suit. This time, the heirs of Ed Townsend are claiming that the famous song “Thinking Out Loud” sounded too much like “Let’s Get It On” — co-written by Ed Townsend and sang by Marvin Gaye. The heirs assert that “the melodic, harmonic and rhythmic composition in ‘Thinking’ are not the product of independent creation,” suing the singer, record labels, promoters and everybody associated with “Thinking Out Loud.” The plaintiffs claim that the pop singer “copied the ‘heart’ of ‘Let’s [Get It On]’ and repeated it continuously throughout ‘Thinking.’” Allegedly, the British pop idol was aware of the striking similarity with the Marvin Gaye song as he sometimes performed the R&B classic with his own 2014 hit single. What is more, the plaintiffs apparently confronted ...
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